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20121027
20121104
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
a child with an african man at a time when nearly two dozen states had laws against interracial marriage. >> narrator: he would not see his son for ten years. >> barry obama had a pretty unsettling childhood. i mean, he didn't ow his father. his mother was very loving and protective, but she was also finding herself. basically, he and she grew up together. >> she then became involved with an indonesian and married him and had a child with him. so she had two biracial children from different cultures who she raised largely by herself. >> narrator: they lived in jakarta. he was now called barry soetoro. his stepfather lolo was troubled. >> he's drinki quite a lot. q there's evidence of at least one act of domestiviolence against her. >> narrator: stanley ann taught english. while she worked, barry esd to len how to cope.w >> imagine what it would be like at age six to be thrown into the chaotic, swirling environment of a dense neighborhood in jakarta, indonesia, not knowing the language, not knowing anything, looking a little different. he had to fend for himself. every step along the way,
wall street." he is now a senior fellow and adjunct professor at the new york university school of law. neil barofsky, welcome. >> thank you. >> when you were a kid, did you say, "mom, dad, i want to grow up and be an inspector general?" >> no, i said i wanted to be a lawyer, though. >> you did? >> it must be some sort of major genetic flaw i have. but my mom keeps a fortune cookie that said, "you will be a great lawyer one day." and i signed it and dated it. i thini was 12 years old.12 so there was something weird about me that i wanted to be a lawyer. i wanted to be a prosecutor. i mean, that was sort of what i wanted to do. maybe it's from watching tv shows, "perry mason," as a kid or something like that. but i was always drawn to the law. and so i think i did have this drive for public service. but certainly never did think that i'd be an inspector general one day. i didn't rlly even know what ll that was until i actually got at the job, to be honest with you. >> when you took the job, i read about you. and i thought, "why is someone like that, with that record of prosecution going
coyle of the dtional law journal. >> woodruff: and spencer michels looks at the complaints about apple's maps and the high stakes for those trying to come up with something better. >> the battle over digital map making indicates how crucial this field has become and it could bode well for consumers as the maps get better. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding or the pbs newshour has been provided by: di ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. io >> woodruff: the u.s. death toll from the giant storm named sandy has risen to at least 63 today. about 6.5 million homes and businesses are still without electricity though there were signs of daily life returning to its usual rhythm in some ples. a familiar sound returned to lower manhattan streets last night. ( horns honking ) the power did not. police he
indiscriminately and kill a lot of civilians, that's also a violation ofnternational law.nt >> warner: but the threat of legal action offers no protection to these students, who now dream of what they'll become when they grow up. >> dentist. >> teacher". >> wner: no one can tell them when this war will end, what kind of country they will inherit, and whether they'll live to fulfill those dreams.ne >> brown: next, immigration may not be a front-burner issue for the presidential candidates right now, but it is something many voters care about in the swing state of iowa. paul yeager of iowa public television reports on how mographic shifts in his state are changing the political landscape.mo his story is part of our new collaboration with public media partners across the country from areas that will likely determine the outcome of the election in a series we call "battleground dispatches." >> reporter: last fall, in the run up to the reican causes, illegal immigration was a hot topic on the campaign trail in iowa. >> if you hire someone who is illegal, we're going to sanction you. >> rep
: they will say we're playing by the rules." >> absolutely. those are the rules. it's the law. they are allowed to do that until the law changes they are well within their legal rights to do it. >> brown: so where else?nl stay with the outside spending playing a big role. where do you see that? >> one state where it's sort of reversed is in indiana where the democratic candidate has been getting more of a benefit. in that stat joe donnelly has spent less of his own money on ads than the outside democratic groups so that's another big one. and virginia is huge and i've been told by people we watch these things closely, the people who watch who's up and who's down that it's made a sigficant difference in virginia d the republican candidate george allen has been vastly outspent. i think he's spe about $3 million on ads. outside groups have spent about $14 million on ads and that has allowed him to complete blow for blow with timain. >> brown: the interesting other case is massachusetts, lots of money, tons of money but not from outside, right? >> exactly. the two candidates, scott brown and elizab
on a native american reservation in north dakota, and it explores clashes of culture and law between tribal and state jurisdictions in investigating a crime. i talked with louise erdrich recently and asked her how she came to write the book. >> i was really haunted for years by the background, the political background. but i didn't want to write a political diatribe ofny sort. so i waited and waited to have some character come tome me and speak to me about this situation. >> so if it started with this issue, then let's explain the issue. because, and it's not giving away much of the move told say there is this jurisdictional problem, right, of law, who is a native, who has jurisdiction over crimes. but what is it that you wanted to explore. explain the problem. >> well, i'm-- there's a legacy of violence against gottenwomen that has worse a worse over time.e and historically the underpinnings lie in the complex nature of land tenure on native reservations. each piece of land has a different jurisdictional authority. a lot of this, there's attempts to solve this. one of the most recent was s
of who's going to be elected r a specific office or what kind of laws are going to be passed by congress. >> you have a better chance to be an organ donor than seeing any other a retirement moy. >> yeah i think this is a perfect, kind of forum, for us all to come and talk about -- >> back and forth. >> yes. i've seen many souls changed in the last three days. >> really. >> yeah. on all sides including the othr side of the --. >> i went through the woodstock generation and i thought it's back to business as usual. and sort of it was a big party. that's whatg i see this as, a party with no cover. i'm a defender of money. freedom, individual freedom, rich people. because i'm still, even though i've not gray, i'm still trying to be one. because the more money i have the more good i can do. they're all rich people. reverend ike a black minister who ed to preach up near new york. he used eded say if you curse t rich, you will never be one. >> i mea look at the people out here. do you think they're out here just hanging out? i mean, that blows my mind that you came out here and you said, well,
of florida. y know they have to open right away. there is actually a law in the state of florida, also, that if you have more than "x" number of gas stationst you have to have a hookup regenerater. so we're prepared here to make sure we can get those things up and running. >> tom: we're talking about states that aren't-- this isre the second hurricane in 14 months, but new york,ew jersey, delaware, pennsylvania, cnnecticut, these are not hurricane-prepared states historically speaking.nn >> histically that's correct. this is pretty resilient people up there, though. >> tom: sure. >> what we are hoping is they local emergency managers did the things they need to do and it will be awhile before we get electricity back. that will be an issue. and we're going have toic make sure there is adequate supply of generators to get the key things up and running like our grocery t stores, gas stations, hospitals, and make sure we get those upjohn line first. >> you inherited a bee's nest worth of trouble after you came in two weeks after hurricane katrina. how has the agency changed in order to re
by federal law ratherhan the constitution. congress could change that datee there's actually provision for, if a state doesn't get it vote in on time,ot bacally for the state legislature to maca a decision about which electors to end to vote for president. so there are actually ways v for that to happen. i just don't think anybody is that the a point right now. >> ifill: if you'reys in massachusetts or connecticut a your constituents don't have power, they're not watching the ads, maybe the voting machines aren't working, sandy couldave a more direct effect. >> i think we're going to have to wait for that week. it will have an effect certainly on the candidates' abilities to communicate their messages in the last days. a lot of candidates will hold back money so that they can barrage voters with ads in the last week.av some of the candidates that have may find out it wasn't a good idea to husband all that money. perhaps they should have put the money out earlier. obviously nobody could have predicted this. >> ifill: when the peopl get their power back, they will see ads. >> no doubt. ifill
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)

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